Deprived Sleep can give Rise to Cancer, Diabetes, Alzheimer’s and other Fatal Diseases

Deprived sleep is one of the major issue seen globally. Many youngsters and old people are facing these issues. The smartphone, internet, and other addictions are hindering the healthy sleeping habits of an individual. Even though we are aware that daily 7 hours of sleep is necessary to maintain the proper functioning of the body, many of us hardly manage to maintain this.

The deprived sleep can give rise to other health issues like Cancer, Alzheimer’s, diabetes and other conditions. Unhealthy sleeping habit or insufficient sleeping hours not only makes you feel clumsy but is linked to different disorders. Insufficient sleep hours can also shorten your lifespan.

The study researcher named Matthew Walker from the University of California have spent 4 years in studying the positive and negative sleep habits. The impact of sleeping habits was mentioned in the book “Why We Sleep: The New Science of Sleep and Dreams.” Besides the recommendations from the health experts, this book also serves as a valuable guide which reflects the importance of adequate sleep hours.

It is recommended that every individual should read this book so that they will try to sleep at least 7 hours a day. When an individual sleep for less than 7 hours the killer cells in our body which are responsible for attacking the cancer cells are reduced by 70%. This increases the risk of diseases. Hence the individual who sleeps for less than 7 hours is sleep deprived individuals.

Even the brainless jellyfish needs to sleep daily which indicates that we human beings are only creatures who try to skip sleep. This habit should be changed and the individuals should focus on healthy sleep habits. Also, there should be specific sleep duration which should be strictly followed. This should become a routine.

This will also safeguard an individual from depression and will make them feel fresh. Thus, adequate sleep will help an individual to stay away from the risk of different disorders.